Tag Archives: main_campus

History of the Saltine Warrior

Overview

Saltine Warrior mascot at an SU football game in 1977.

The Saltine Warrior was the official mascot of Syracuse University for 47 years from 1931 to 1978. The article claims excavation revealed the ancient location of an Onondagan “fortress or tribal house” which had been destroyed by a fire but included the remains of arrowheads, flint instruments, and fragments of textile.  The Orange Peel credits Dr. Burges Johnson for the announcement of the archaeological findings. The Orange Peel writes “for nearly two years campus experts have been working quietly upon those textile fragments” in order to reveal “the portrait of an early Onondagan chief” painted by Hibbardus Kleine, “undoubtedly one of those intrepid Jesuit explorers” first to visit the area. The name of the Chief depited in the portrait was “O-gee-ke-da Ho-schen-e-ga-da”, which The Orange Peel claimed translates to mean “The Salt (or salty) warrior” in English . The statue currently stands in the south-east corner of Shaw Quadrangle next to the Shaffer Art Building.

For 45 years, many people believed the legend of the Saltine Warrior was true. This was due in large part to media reports as factual by The Daily Orange, The Alumni News, and downtown Syracuse papers . “The thing that offended me when I was there was that guy running around like a nut. That’s derogatory” Lyons explained . Onkwehonweneha arranged a meeting with the Onondaga Nation Council of Chiefs and brothers of Lambda Chi in an effort to relieve tension over the mascot removal 28. George-Kanentiio recalls the meeting:

“During a remarkable session in the old communal longhouse at Onondaga, the brothers of Lambda Chi, the Native students of SU and the Onondaga chiefs met to discuss this issue. Some type of magic was certainly in the air because when we left that session some hours later, the Lambda Chi organization agreed with us that the Warrior must be put to rest. These young men went on to become our most vigorous supporters in whatever we did at SU.” 29

Onkwehonweneha used the Saltine Warrior controversy as a way to spread campus awareness on Native American issues 30. The support that Onkwehonweneha received from Chancellor Melvin A. Eggers opened the doors to increasing Native awareness by sponsoring Native speakers, holding various social events, and introducing classes on Iroquois culture 31.

 Conclusion

During this time, the issue of Native Americans as mascots became a national movement. Schools all over the country were abolishing their Native American mascots, Syracuse University being one of the first. Today, Syracuse University of has a Native American Studies program within the College of Arts and Sciences. The program offers a and a 32. Syracuse University also offers the to qualified students who receive financial assistance equal to the cost of tuition, housing and meals. The Haudenosaunee Promise Scholarship Program ”seeks to make the rich educational experiences of Syracuse University available to admitted, qualified, first-year and transfer American Indian students.” 33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. “Syracuse University History: Syracuse University Mascots.” Syracuse University Archives. Syracuse University, n.d. Web. 18 February 2013.
  2. “Syracuse University History: Syracuse University Mascots.” Syracuse University Archives. Syracuse University, n.d. Web. 18 February 2013.
  3. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Students Research Warrior Saga’s Origin.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  4. “Syracuse University History: Syracuse University Mascots.” Syracuse University Archives. Syracuse University, n.d. Web. 18 February 2013.
  5. “The True Story of Bill Orange.” The Syracuse Orange Peel, October 1931. Syracuse University Archives. 18 February 2013.
  6. “The True Story of Bill Orange.” The Syracuse Orange Peel, October 1931. Syracuse University Archives. 18 February 2013.
  7. “Syracuse University History: Syracuse University Mascots.” Syracuse University Archives. Syracuse University, n.d. Web. 18 February 2013.
  8. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  9. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Students Research Warrior Saga’s Origin.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  10. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Students Research Warrior Saga’s Origin.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  11. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  12. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  13. “Syracuse University History: Syracuse University Mascots.” Syracuse University Archives. Syracuse University, n.d. Web. 18 February 2013.
  14. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  15. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  16. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  17. Reigelhaupt, Barbara. “Myth of Saltine Warrior Foolum SU Many Moons.” The Daily Orange, 23 March 1976. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  18. “Onondaga Indian Fact Sheet.” Native American Facts for Kids.Native Languages of the Americas, n.d. Web 29 March 2013
  19. George-Kanentiio, Doug. Personal Interview. 9 April 2013.
  20. George-Kanentiio, Doug. Personal Interview. 9 April 2013.
  21. George-Kanentiio, Doug. Personal Interview. 9 April 2013.
  22. George-Kanentiio, Doug. Personal Interview. 9 April 2013.
  23. McEnaney, Maura. “SU Drops Saltine Warrior”. The Daily Orange, 18 January 1978. Microfilm. 18 February 2013
  24. McEnaney, Maura. “SU Drops Saltine Warrior”. The Daily Orange, 18 January 1978. Microfilm. 18 February 2013
  25. Coffey, Thomas. “Save the Mascot.” The Daily Orange, 3 March 1978. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  26. Onkwehonweneha. “Letter: Warrior Based on a Lie”. The Daily Orange, 3 March 1978. Microfilm. 18 February 2013.
  27. George-Kanentiio, Doug. Personal Interview. 9 April 2013.
  28. George-Kanentiio, Doug. “Natives Saw Chancellor’s Moral Center.” Syracuse University Archives, Chancellor Melvin C. Eggers Files. Syracuse Post-Standard, 8 January 1995
  29. George-Kanentiio, Doug. “Natives Saw Chancellor’s Moral Center.” Syracuse University Archives, Chancellor Melvin C. Eggers Files. Syracuse Post-Standard, 8 January 1995
  30. George-Kanentiio, Doug. “Natives Saw Chancellor’s Moral Center.” Syracuse University Archives, Chancellor Melvin C. Eggers Files. Syracuse Post-Standard, 8 January 1995.
  31. George-Kanentiio, Doug. “Natives Saw Chancellor’s Moral Center.” Syracuse University Archives, Chancellor Melvin C. Eggers Files. Syracuse Post-Standard, 8 January 1995.

Main Campus Housing

Main Campus Housing includes 19 dorms spread around the Quad. First year students are required to live in main campus dorms, unless they are over 21, transfer students, or live in the Syracuse area. Each dorm on Main Campus has one or two resident advisors (RAs). The RAs are responsible for resident programing, acting as a semi-counselor, and enforcing Office of Resident Life policies. All dorms on Main Campus have mail serviced by SU Mail Services and have laundry facilities in the dorm.

Boland, Brewster, and Brockway Hall

Booth Hall

Butterfield House Hall

Day Hall

Dellplain Hall

Ernie Davis Hall

Flint Hall

Haven Hall

Kimmel Hall

Lawrinson Hall

Marion Hall

Lyons Hall

Sadler Hall

Shaw Hall

Walnut Hall

Washington Arms Hall

Watson Hall

References

“Office of Residence Life.” Office of Residence Life. Syracuse Unviersity, n.d. Web. 13 Apr. 2013.

 

Watson Hall

Watson Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 405 University Place and was built in 1954.[1]. Watson Hall is one of Syracuse’s most desirable dorms because it is practically on the quad and because there are suites and townhouses available. The Facebook page for Watson Hall can be found at . Almost every bus route that stops on Syracuse University Campus passes Watson Hall. This is because it is where University Avenue and College Place intersect. The principal bus hub for Syracuse University is located on College Place.

Watson Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Watson Hall is one of Syracuse University’s most popular main campus dormitories because of its proximity to campus. It is across from Ernie Davis Hall about two minutes from the quad.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Watson Hall houses 448 residents on six floors. The rooms are coed by alternating rooms. The ground floor has six open doubles, one 4-person suite, two offices, one bathroom and a laundry facility. Watson Hall also has a campus grocery store named Food Works and the Watson Theater on the ground floor. Food Works offers grocery items as well as fresh fruit. The Watson Theater is a classroom and is used for large lecture classes.

In 1999 the Robert B. Menschel Media Center was built as an addition to Watson hall and named after the SU alumni and university trustee who donated to the project. This facility houses Light Work, community darkrooms, multimedia displays, a digital imaging lab, a computer lab, is the home of CitrusTV, and two student run radio stations (WERW AM 1570 and WJPZ FM 89).

The first floor has a main desk and mailboxes as well as dorm rooms. There are six two-person suites, one six-person suite, 13 four-person suites, two open doubles, two singles, two rooms for RAs, one four-person suite with bath, one two-person suite with bath, two staff rooms, and four bathrooms. The second floor has five two-person suites, 16 four person suites, five open doubles, four singles, three rooms for RAs, one six-person suite, one four-person suite, two three-person suites, a staff room and four bathrooms.

The third floor has four two-person suites, 14 four-person suites, six open doubles, four singles, three rooms for RAs, one three-person suite, four bathrooms and a lounge area. The fourth floor has four two-person suites, 23 four-person suites, five open doubles, three singles, three three-person suites, three rooms for RAs and five bathrooms. The fourth floor also has two-level townhouses available. There are eight four-person suites and two three-person suites.

Because Watson Hall offers suites and townhouses, it is one the most popular dormitories. Watson Hall’s residents are usually upperclassmen and the dormitory is filled up quickly in the rooming selection process.[2].

Dining Options

Residents of Watson Hall typically eat at Ernie Davis Dining Hall, which is across the street. They are also close to Kimmel Food Court and the Schine Student Center, which similarly to Kimmel Food Court offers food from Sbarro pizza and has a sandwich section. There is also a salad bar, a Dunkin Donuts, and hot food such as French fries, hamburgers, and chicken at the Schine Student Center.

Amenities

Watson Hall contains:

• Main Lounge

• Study Space

• Laundry Facility

• Food Works campus grocery

• Watson Theater

Notes

 

Washington Arms Hall

Washington Arm Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 621 Walnut Avenue and similar to Walnut Hall, it is more apartment-style.[1]. Washington Arms shares a Facebook page with Haven and Walnut Hall, which can be found at https://www.facebook.com/H2WatSU. There are no SU shuttle routes located near Washington Arms.

Washington Arms Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Washington Arms Hall is one of the farthest dormitories from the quad. It is located about a block behind Haven Hall and is close to many Syracuse University fraternity and sorority houses. It is about 20 minutes from the quad. Its location is not very convenient for its residents, if most of their classes in on the quad, but it is one of the nicer looking dormitories.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Washington Arms Hall houses 66 residents on five floors. Its set-up is more similar to that of an apartment than to that of a dormitory. The first floor has an office conference services office, a main lobby, a conference room, a large recreation room, a large study room, a laundry facility, vending, and a men and women bathroom. Washington Arms Hall is also home to the Resident Life Office.

The second floor has two two-person suites with a bathroom, one large double with a bathroom, and three three-person suites with a bathroom. Each of these rooms has a spacious living room area. There is also a kitchen area, which includes a stove, oven, sink and microwave.

Floors three, four, and five has two two-person suites with a bathroom, one large double with a bathroom, one room for the RA and three three-person suites with a bathroom. The RA’s room has a large bathroom and a living room space. There is also a kitchen area, which includes a stove, open, sink and microwave on each floor.[2].

Dining Options

Residents of Washington Arms Hall are not required to have a meal plan, which is good because the closest dining hall is Ernie Davis Hall, which still isn’t that close. Most residents eat on Marshall Street, which is about two blocks away.

Amenities

Washington Arms Hall includes:

• Study Lounge

• Television Room

• Laundry Facility

• Kitchen area on each floor

Notes

Walnut Hall

Walnut Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 809 Walnut Ave. [1]. Walnut Hall is more apartment-style than typical dorms on campus. For example, there is a foyer and kitchen space. Walnut Hall shares a Facebook page with Haven and Washington Arms, which can be found at . Walnut Hall is located within walking distance of the Quad Shuttle route, which can be found at http://centro.org/Syracuse-University-Service.aspx.

Walnut Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Walnut Hall is located next to Haven Hall and about two blocks behind Bird Library. It is to the left of the Whitman School of Management Building and is desirable for Whitman students who spend most of their time in that part of campus. It is about 10 minutes away from the quad.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Walnut Hall houses 47 residents on four floors. It is coed by alternating rooms. Floor one has five regular open doubles, one regular single, one staff apartment, a foyer and three bathrooms. There is also a main desk and mail boxes. Floors two and three has four regular open doubles, four large open doubles, one large single, and one room for the RA. Floor four has four large open doubles, and four bathrooms. The building also has a study lounge, a meeting space, a kitchen and a dining room open to its residents.[2].

Dining Options

The closest Dining Hall to Walnut Hall is located in Ernie Davis Dining Hall, which is within a couple of minutes walking distance. Residents can also choose to eat on Marshall Street, which is within two blocks.

Amenities

Walnut Hall contains:

• Study Lounge

• Meeting Space

• Kitchen

• Dining Room

• Foyer

Notes

Shaw Hall

Shaw Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 775 Comstock Ave. and was built in 1952. [1]. Prior to the opening of Ernie Davis Hall, Shaw Hall was one of the most popular dorms because of its proximity to the quad and because it had the biggest dining hall on campus, which also stayed open the latest. Shaw Hall shares a Facebook page with Lyons Hall, which can be found at .

Shaw Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Shaw Hall is located across from the Science and Technology Center and on the same street as several fraternity and sorority houses. It is about 3 minutes away from the quad.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Shaw Hall houses 480 residents on five floors. The Dormitory is oddly shaped, so each floor has a different floor plan. The ground floor has classrooms as well as dorm rooms. There are six split doubles, one open double, and one room for the RA. There is also one bathroom and one lounge area. The first floor contains the main desk and mailboxes, the Shaw Dining Center, and dorm rooms. There are 16 open-doubles, three singles, two rooms for RAs, five split doubles, and one four-person suite. Additionally, there are three bathrooms, one lounge area, and one staff room.

The second floor has 29 open doubles, six singles, ten split doubles, and two rooms for RAs. The rooms are split into two wings and on each wing is a bathroom and a lounge area. The third floor has 52 open doubles, four singles, 10 split doubles, and four rooms for RAs. There are four bathrooms and four lounge areas as well. The fourth floor has 31 open doubles, three singles, 10 split doubles, and two rooms for RAs. There are two bathrooms and two lounge areas. Finally, the fifth floor has 24 open doubles, 10 split doubles, two singles, and two rooms for RAs. Like the fourth floor, there are two bathrooms and two lounge areas.[2].

Dining Options

Shaw Hall contains the Shaw Dining Center, which is one of the more spacious dining halls and offers a bigger variety of food than other dining halls, such as Sadler Dining. There is a Sbarro pizza section, which serves pizza and pasta. There is also a sandwich section, a salad bar, and a specialty section, which serves Chinese-style noodles once a week. Shaw Dining is also the only dining hall that serves kosher and halal food for Muslim and Jewish students during dinner and lunch. To order kosher and halal food call 315.443.2383 in advance.

Amenities

Shaw Hall contains:

• Dining Center

• Laundry Facility

• Study Rooms

• Snack Bar

• Classrooms

Notes

Sadler Hall

Sadler Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 1000 Irving Ave. and was built in 1960. [1]. The Facebook Page for Sadler can be found at . Sadler Hall is on both the Quad Shuttle and Connective Corridor bus routes, which can be found at http://centro.org/Syracuse-University-Service.aspx.

Sadler Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Sadler Hall is located behind and to the left of the Carrier Dome. It is next to Lawrinson Hall and is about 15 minutes away from the quad.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Sadler Hall has eight floors and houses 471 residents. The first floor contains of the main desk and mailboxes, a game room, a snack bar, staff offices/rooms, and rooms for residents. There is one room for the RA, two split doubles with a bathroom, seven split doubles, three singles, four open doubles, and two four-person suites. There is also a large lounge with a TV and couches. The lounge lead to the Sadler Dining Hall, which is on the ground floor. Floors two through eight consist of two rooms for RAs, four singles, two four-person suites, five open doubles, seven split doubles, 12 large split doubles, and two bathrooms. There is also a large lounge with a TV, couches and a microwave. The floors are coed by alternating rooms and there are three elevators.

Dining Options

On the ground floor of Sadler Hall is its dining area, which is used by mostly residents of Sadler Hall and Lawrinson Hall. The Dining Hall is buffet style. It has a salad bar, a small vegetarian station, a specialty station (Stir-Fry, Mexican, etc.) and two other stations of food – one of which is for pizza. The Dining Hall has a good amount of variation from day-to-day, but it known to be repetitive from week to week. There are also no kitchens in Sadler or Lawrinson so residents, for the most part, only eat dining hall food. There is a snack bar on the first floor of Sadler Hall, which offers smoothies from Freshens. The snack bar is only during night hours. [2].

Amenities

Sadler Hall contains:

• Dining Hall

• Snack Bar

• Laundry Room

• Game Room

== Notes ==

Lyons Hall

Lyons Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 401 Euclid Ave [1]. Built in 1971, Lyons Hall is named after Oren Lyons, a prominent member of the Onondaga Nation. Lyons Hall once served as the International Living Center, but is now available to all students. The Facebook page Lyons and Shaw Hall share can be found at . There are no bus lines that access this resident hall.

Lyons Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Lyons Hall is located about two blocks away from Shaw Hall. It is closer to off-campus housing and is one of the farther dormitories in regards to proximity to the quad. It is about 20 minutes away from the quad. It is also one of the smaller dormitories.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Lyons Hall has 38 residents on three floors. It is coed by alternating rooms. The basement and first floor has lounges, a meeting space, a partial kitchen, and a laundry facility. The first floor has a main desk and lobby area as well.

The second and third floors are identical in floor plan. There are four open triples, two doubles, two singles, one room for the RA and four bathrooms. Because there are only two floors, there is no elevator.

Dining Options

The closest dining hall to Lyons Hall is Shaw Dining Hall, which is about two blocks away. Shaw Hall is by far the most convenient dining option for residents because of how far away the dormitory is from the quad and other Syracuse University buildings. The Shaw Dining Center is one of the more spacious dining halls and offers a bigger variety of food than other dining halls, such as Sadler Dining. There is a Sbarro pizza section, which serves pizza and pasta. There is also a sandwich section, a salad bar, and a specialty section, which serves Chinese-style noodles once a week.

Amenities

Oren Lyons Hall contains:

• Lounges

• Meeting Space

• Partial Kitchen

• Laundry Facility

Notes

Marion Hall

Marion Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 305 Waverly Ave. and was built in 1954. [1]. Marion Hall is closest to the Quad Shuttle route and the schedule can be found at http://centro.org/Syracuse-University-Service.aspx. Marion Hall shares a Facebook with Kimmel Hall, which can be found at https://www.facebook.com/KMHallsatSU?ref=ts&fref=ts.

Marion Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Marion Hall is located next to Kimmel Hall and is about five minutes away from the quad.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Marion Hall houses 143 residents on four floors, three of which are designated for dorm rooms. The basement has a laundry facility and a small fitness center. The rooms are coed by alternating rooms. The first floor has 20 open doubles, one two-person suite, one room for the RA, a large lounge and two bathrooms. The second and third floors are identical in floor plan. There are 24 open doubles, one single, one room for the RA, one lounge, and two bathrooms on each floor. Each floor also has a trash room where residents can place their trash and recyclables. [2].

Dining Options

Residents of Marion Hall can eat at Kimmel Food Court, which differs from the buffet style of Dining Halls. Rather than using a meal plan, students pay for individual food items. Food offered at Kimmel Dining include Sbarro pizza, KFC, Burger King, sandwiches, ice cream and grocery items such as soda and chips. Residents can also eat at  Ernie David Dining Hall,  which  is about five minutes away.

Amenities

Marion Hall contains:

• Large Lounge Area

• Laundry Facility

• Fitness Center

Notes

Lawrinson Hall

Lawrinson Hall is a dormitory on the Syracuse University main campus. It is located at 303 Stadium Place and was built in 1965.[1]. Lawrinson Hall is often referred to as L-town by its residents. Kimmel Hall is on the Quad Shuttle route and the Connective Corridor. The schedules can be found at . The Facebook page for Lawrinson can be found at https://www.facebook.com/LawrinsonHallatSU.

Lawrinson Hall. Photo Credit: Syracuse University. Creative Commons License.

Location

Lawrinson Hall is located behind and to the left of the Carrier Dome. It is one of Syracuse University’s more isolated dormitories because of its distance to the quad. It is about 15 minutes away from the quad and is next to Sadler Hall.

Floor Plan and Room Set-Up

Lawrinson Hall is home to 537 residents – mostly freshman and sophomores. It has 18 floors for residents and 21 floors in total. The height of the dormitory makes it one of the most visible buildings when driving into or out of the Syracuse University area.During the winter season a lot of wind picks up near the higher floors of the building. Window screens are known to fall off when the wind picks up and often times, when the wind is really bad. Often times it feels like the building is shaking, especially for residents on higher floors. Students report a constant whistling sound on the upper floors and were particularly unsettled during Hurricane Sandy in fall of 2013.

Renovations finished in 2011 so every floor is either brand new or was just renovated with new furniture and bathrooms. With the new renovations (including 6 private bathrooms), each floor is now coed instead of before when each floor was single sex with one bathroom.

Each floor has their own laundry facilities. The dock is extremely helpful when it is time to move in and out of the dorm. The first floor contains the main desk, mailboxes, and a University Bookstore branch. The second floor has a computer cluster and printers as well as games and a lounge area with a TV. Games include table tennis and pool. Equipment can be checked out of the main desk with a SU ID every day of the week. Floors three through 21 are dorm rooms and floor 21 contains a penthouse for Hall events and meetings, though it is not always accessible by residents. There are three elevators, however only one goes to the second floor and basement. Additionally, the elevators often take a while because there are so many residents.

Lawrinson Hall is coed on each floor. In addition to 18 dorm rooms, each floor contains 6 private bathroom, a lounge with couches and a TV, a study room, a microwave and 2 sinks. The study room has been renovated, however they are small, but they have a nice view of the city at night. The lounge is a good size and nice for meetings or watching TV with friends and/or floor mates.

There are 15 dorm rooms on every floor. One is for the RA, nine are split doubles, one is a single, and four are corner doubles. The split doubles are usually reserved for incoming freshmen.[2].

Dining Options

The closest Dining Hall to Lawrinson is Sadler Dining Hall, which is less than a minute walk away. Sadler Hall is right next to Lawrinson and there is even an underground tunnel that some students use to avoid the snow or other bad weather conditions, however because it is so close, the tunnel is hardly used. Lawrinson Hall also has a University Bookstore branch, which sells food such as chips, soda, frozen food, dry foods such as crackers and mac and cheese, and ice cream.

Amenities

Lawrinson Hall contains:

• Laundry room

• University Bookstore branch

• Computer cluster and printers

• Pool table and table-tennis

• Penthouse

Notes